Sugar houses across NH open to the public for Maple Weekend

More than 100 sugar houses across New Hampshire are open to the public this weekend, an opportunity for maple producers to sell products and show off their individual traditions. The New Hampshire Maple Producers Association has 365 members, of which about 150 sugar houses opened for maple weekend. “They use that money to start their other agricultural products, whether it’s the dairy industry, fruit growers, vegetable growers and things like that, maple is the number one agricultural product and that’s really what said Andrew Chisholm, president of the New Hampshire Maple Producers Association, has many of our state farms turning to the year-round and the hot days needed to keep the sap flowing. “It’s warmed up too fast.” , Chisholm said.Chris Hicks owns the sugar shack at Morningstar Farm in Plaistow.It would normally start boiling around Valentine’s Day, but this year things remained frozen until after March 1, creating a very short season.” This is only our third boil and that’ll be about it for the year,” Hicks said. They can make nearly 1,200 gallons of maple syrup in one season, but this year , they may not reach 300 , but conditions in the northern part of the state are still good. “The guys up north are still riding hard and God help them, I hope they have a good season and make lots of syrup because I’ll probably try to buy some from them this year,” Hicks said. also facing supply issues, struggling to get plastic and glass containers for packaging, but what they have they are eager to sell.

More than 100 sugar houses across New Hampshire are open to the public this weekend, an opportunity for maple producers to sell products and show off their individual traditions.

The New Hampshire Maple Producers Association has 365 members, of which about 150 sugar houses opened for maple weekend.

“They use that money to start their other agricultural products, whether it’s the dairy industry, fruit growers, vegetable growers and things like that, maple is the number one agricultural product and that’s really what that many of our state farms are turning to the year, said Andrew Chisholm, president of the New Hampshire Maple Producers Association.

Chisholm owns and operates Chisholm Farm and said for downstate growers, this will likely be their last weekend as they haven’t seen the cold nights and hot days needed for sap.

“He warmed up too quickly,” Chisholm said.

Chris Hicks owns the sugar shack at Morningstar Farm in Plaistow. It would normally start boiling around Valentine’s Day, but this year things remained frozen until March 1, creating a very short season.

“This is only our third boil and that will be about it for the year,” Hicks said.

They can produce nearly 1,200 gallons of maple syrup in one season, but this year they may not reach 300, but conditions in the northern part of the state are still good.

“The guys up north keep riding hard and God help them, I hope they have a good season and make lots of syrup because I’m probably going to try and buy some this year,” Hicks said.

Sweets are also facing supply issues, struggling to get plastic and glass containers for packaging, but what they have they are eager to sell.

Rachel J. Bradford